Book Reviews: Rapid Organizational Change

Interested in Becoming a Member?

An SIM Membership like no other, provides you with an abundance of tools, resources and opportunities to help you achieve your professional and personal success at every step of the way! Be part of our learning community of more than 34,000 corporate and individual members.


For more information about membership, please click here »

Member Login

If u are a subscriber, please use ur subscriber login.
If you are a SIM Member, please use your SIM Membership login.



Forgot your password?

Member Login



Forgot your password?
login  Cancel

Sign Up

If you wish to sign up for a SIM Membership, please click here

Subscribe

If you wish to subscribe to Today's Manager, please click here

If you wish to subscribe to Singapore Management Review, please click here

Website maintenance notice: Website will not be accessible from 27 June (11 pm) to 28 June (9 am) due to scheduled maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

Home > Articles > Book Reviews: Rapid Organizational Change

 Book Reviews: Rapid Organizational Change

Today's Manager
December 1, 2017


Rapid Organizational Change
By Steven Bleistein
John Wiley & Sons
Reviewer: Sadie-Jane Nunis

Mindset is Key to Organisational Change

DR Steven Bleistein is based in Tokyo, Japan and is a renowned expert in the field of rapid organisational growth and change. I met him for an interview when he was recently in Singapore and was even more impressed by how his mind works.

There are numerous books shelved under management that look at organisational change, mindset change, and the like, however, this is one of the first I have seen that discusses lessons based on case studies in Japan. What is even more interesting is that upon reading further, one will realise that many of the examples could happen in one’s own country.

Dr Bleistein provocatively implies that chief executive officers tend to blame culture when queried about underperformance. This read is even more interesting as it is rich in depth and chockful of his own experiences of dealing with various companies.

I enjoyed every page of it and I look forward to adding it to my re-read pile. I am always intrigued to read about how other countries, especially those in Asia do business or find out more about how they manage their teams.

With this book, Dr Bleistein has, in my opinion, proven that any CEO from any country needs to drop the excuses and really look at how to work with their team to achieve organisational change instead of merely being hindering blocks.

Dr Bleistein begins a new column for Today’s Manager in 2018. Definitely looking forward to that.

 

Copyright © 2017 Singapore Institute of Management

Article Found In

Today's Manager Issue 4, 2017

View Issue
 

Browse Articles

By Topic
By Industry
By Geography